God has planted this gift for singing in my heart

Navajo

When I asked one of the most successful singers [of tales] with whom I became acquainted whether he could sing this or that song, he replied to me:  ‘I can sing any song there is because God has planted this gift for singing in my heart. He supplies my tongue with the word without my having to search for it. I have not learned to sing any of my songs; everything gushes out of my insides, out of myself.

 

Wilhelm Radloff (mid 19th century-1918), quoting a Kirghiz epic, in “Samples of Folk Literature from the North Turkic Tribes” translated by Gudrum Böchter Sherman with Adam Brooke Davis, Oral Literature, 5: 84; this is a part of Radloff’s book Aus Sibirien, published in Leipzig, 1854
Illustration inspired by a design of the Navajo people

 

 

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Nothing to fear during the performance

 

Pez dentado

Before Keldibek began a performance of Manas he told the herdsmen that they might come to the camp without fear because their cattle would go home by themselves, and no one –neither man nor wild beast– could steal even the last sheep whilst he was singing Manas. But when he began to sing, the yurt trembled, a mighty hurricane arose amid whose murk and din supernatural horsemen, Companions of Manas, flew down so that the earth shuddered beneath their horses’s hooves.

Kirghiz; quoted in Hatto, “Kirghiz”, en Traditions of Heroic and Epic Poetry. Volume I: The Traditions, edited by A. T. Hatto, London: The Modern Humanities Research Association, p. 305; Manas is the national epic of the Kirghiz people, and tells the exploits of the eponymous hero and his descendants.
Illustration inspired by a drawing of a fish found in New Ireland, Papua New Guinea.