Storytellers for hire in old Russia

CILINDRO HOMO NARR.

As early as in Russian sources of the twelfth century one may read that a rich man, suffering from sleeplessness, ordered his attendants to tickle the soles of his feet, to strum on the gusli, and to tell him fairy tales. Ivan the Terrible, who became one of the popular heroes of the Russian folk tales, was its most avid fancier, and three old blind men followed each other at his bedside, relating fairy tales before he slumbered. Skillful tellers of tales continued to enliven the leisure of tsar and tsarina, of princes and gentry, as late as the eighteenth century. Even at the close of that century we find in Russian newspapers advertisements of blind men applying for work in the homes of the gentry as tellers of tales. Lev Tolstoy, as a child, fell asleep to the tales of an old man who had once been bought by the count’s grandfather, because of his knowledge and masterly rendition of fairy tales.

Roman Jakobson, “On Russian Fairy Tales”, appendix to A. Afanasiev, Russian Fairy Tales, translated by Norbert Guterman, New York: Pantheon, 1945, p. 635
Illustration inspired by a mesopotamian drawing 

 

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Invention and truth

Klickita

The tale is an invention; the song, the truth. (Russian proverb).

Russian proverb, Jakobson «On Russian Fairy Tales», appendix to  A. N. Afanas’ev, Russian Fairy Tales, traducción de Norbert Guterman, Nueva York: Pantheon, 1945, p. 649.
Illustration inspired by the art of the people Klickitat the northwest coast of America.